I Tried Intermittent Fasting and Here's What Happened

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

If you haven’t heard of Intermittent Fasting (IF) I would love to come join you in whatever place you are at that diet culture has yet to contaminate. Intermittent Fasting for those of you whole aren’t familiar is a type of diet (or “style of eating”) that restricts the time frame in which you can consume your calories. Unlike most diets that tell you WHAT you can / can’t eat, IF tells you WHEN you can / can’t eat. There are a bunch of different protocols people choose to follow but the most common is a 16:8 fasting protocol. This means that for 16 hours of the day you fast, while the other 8 hours are your feeding window. Many people choose a “feeding window” from 11-7 or 12-8 pm.

16:8 Intermittent Fasting Schedule

16:8 Intermittent Fasting Schedule

Now before I go on, some of you may be wondering - but this girl preaches Intuitive Eating - what is this whole Intermittent Fasting business she’s talking about - how dare she?! And I know…part of me was hesitant to even post this BUT as a health care provider I prefer to have PERSONAL experience with a variety of different eating style so that when my clients inevitably bring them up, I can speak to them. I’m also not here to judge or tell you what to do with your life. We learn through experience and this was mine…

If you guys follow me on the gram (@FeelGoodDietitian), you guys probably know I was a highly competitive bikini bodybuilder that struggled with bulimia and had a bit of anorexia when I was in high school. Needless to say, my previous relationship with food was not the healthiest. These experiences however give me insight into how my current clients feel and allow me to relate at a personal level. So anyways, when I made the decision to give IF a shot, I promised myself I would be as intuitive as possible and approach it from a place of health (that’s what we all tell ourselves right?). I somehow STILL have H. Pylori even after rounds of antibiotics (but that rant is for another blog post) so I still get bloated. My thought behind starting IF was “well I feel pretty bloated in the morning ESPECIALLY if I eat breakfast so let me just try this whole fasting thing and see how it goes.” I should have just stopped right there….

I got myself a book all about IF, started doing more research, downloaded the Zero app to track my fasts and like always I WAS STOKED & READY TO DO THIS (that dieter’s high). As I read through articles and listened to podcasts and YouTube videos I did learn A LOT of about the research out there on the positive health benefits of fasting such as:

  1. Improved blood sugars (which I have no issues with)

  2. Autophagy (which literally means “self-eating” and is the bodies way to cleaning up old cells - basically an anti-aging process)

  3. Reduction of oxidative-stress

  4. Mental clarity

  5. Improved insulin sensitivity (again, no issues here), increase human-growth-hormone and positive effects of gene-expression

Great! I’m all for improving my health. Let’s do this!

So the first week I tried fasting, I started with 13-14 hour fasts because I read that the female reproductive system is super sensitive to famine and anything beyond 14 may cause issues. I’d start my day with water and some coffee (sometimes I’d throw in 1 tsp of coconut oil or brain octane oil - which is apparently not a true fast but relax….) then I’d eat around 11 am. The second or third day I started noticing mental clarity in the morning as well as A LOT of energy, almost comparable to the excessive caffeine jitters. I noticed I was feeling better when I would fast and then during my eating window I didn’t feel as good. So I started pushing my fasting window a bit longer, 16 hours, 17 hours, 18 hours. Apparently the “benefits of fasting” increase the longer you fast so why not right??? (As much as I continue to work on eroding that black-white thinking part of my personality, occasionally it still rears its ugly black and white head). All in all week 1 was fine. I should also mention I got engaged halfway through week 1 so the motivation level was there. As much as I told myself it was for health benefits only, that diet culture tape started playing in my head about how I would look in my wedding dress. I reassured myself however that it wasn’t about the weight loss and was only about health….mhm.

Week 2, perhaps from severe glycogen depletion or my body sensing what I was doing, was not so great. I was starting to feel super hungry all of the time but that voice in my head telling me it wasn’t time to eat yet popped up. I was starting to miss the previous weeks euphoric fasting high I had felt. Trying to align my work, fasting, eating and exercise schedule was an additional stress I did not need. Frustration and confusion came and went but I persisted on.

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

By week 3, I knew this wasn’t going to work out for me. Side note: for anyone out there that has past experience with an eating disorder, restriction of any kind can be INCREDIBLY triggering. Recovering from an eating disorder is so hard to do, especially living in a culture that is basically shoving disordered eating down your throat (pun intended). Now, I’m not saying recovery from drugs or alcohol is easy but you don’t need to consume heroin or alcohol to sustain life. Recovering from an eating disorder is almost like asking an alcoholic to work or live in a bar for the rest of their life. Just like an alcoholic needs to remove him or herself from certain situations and people, as does someone recovering/recovered from an eating disorder. Not only do you need to surround yourself with supportive people that have a healthy relationship with food, but you also need to remove yourself from situations that trigger ED behavior… LIKE RESTRICTION.

By week 3 I was basically starting to freak out in my head, if I ate before the fasting goal I had set was up, I’d be bummed or felt like I couldn’t handle it. I have enough training/experience to know what to do in these moments but I knew this was not a good thing. My desire to eat was heightened, my thoughts started to revolve around foods and hours and restriction. This was when I called it quits.

Just like any other strict diet however, there are things to take away from the experience to use as information and apply to an intuitive eating practice. By no means am I saying you need to try these strict diets to learn how to eat intuitively - I’m more telling you to not beat yourself up if you tried a diet and it didn’t “work”. Learn from it - what made you feel good, what made you feel bad etc. My main takeaway was if I’m not hungry for breakfast and I skip it I tend to feel better throughout the day (Hello “Honor Your Hunger” principle). Did I need to fast for 20 hours to figure this out…..100% no.

Moral of the story; if you have an eating disorder or past history of one, I would NOT suggest intermittent fasting. If you have a history of yo-yo dieting I also do not think IF is the solution you are looking for. Would I suggest IF to most people - definitely not. I think men tend to do better physically and emotionally with an approach like this but if you feel good and your mental state is equally good while you’re doing intermittent fasting, go for it.

What I would suggest is that you start to see nutrition through an Intuitive Eating lens. Rather than labeling your eating habits as IF, or Keto, Paleo, Whole30, why not just listen to your hunger and fullness cues and eat the foods that you enjoy and improve your sleep/digestion/energy/mood. Why not just eat the foods that make you FEEL GOOD (now and later).

Hunger Fullness Scale / Intuitive Eating

Hunger Fullness Scale / Intuitive Eating

Homemade Nutella (sugar-free)

Not going to lie, I was patting myself on the back for this one. This homemade Nutella tastes just like the stuff you’d buy in the store but without all of the added oils and sugars. Not only is it free of the junk, it’s packed with healthy fats and antioxidants! I’d call that a WIN-WIN.

Homemade Nutella

Homemade Nutella

Ingredients:

  • 2.25 cups dry roasted hazelnuts

  • 1 T + 1 tsp coconut oil

  • 2 T cacao powder

  • 8-12 drops liquid stevia

Directions:

  1. Add hazelnuts and coconut oil to food processor or high-speed blender like a Vitamix (if using Vitamix like I did, you’ll need to use the tamper)

  2. Blend / process on high for 1-2 minutes

  3. Add cacao powder

  4. Blend

  5. Scrape from sides with rubber spatula

  6. Add 8 drops of stevia, blend and taste. Add more for more sweetness

  7. Use a rubber spatula to scrape nutella from sides of the blender/processor into a glass jar or dish

  8. Enjoy with apples, bananas, toast or my favorite way, straight from the jar with a spoon :)

Chocolate Peanut Butter Tarts (gluten-free, keto)

You guys know I’m always chatting about brain health and omega-3’s. Well this tasty treat is packed with omegas thanks to a nice dose of hemp hearts. No don’t worry, not that kind of hemp; the only high you’ll be getting from these is a chocolate peanut butter high.

So what are hemp hearts? Well, they’re the edible interiors of the seed that hemp grows from. The hemp plant does share the same plant species as the marijuana plant. But the hemp plant contains nearly undetectable levels of THC. Hemp hearts contain less than 0.3%, while traditional marijuana plants can contain levels upward of 10 to 30%.

Per serving, hemp hearts contain 10 grams of plant-based protein and 12 grams of omega-3 and omega-6 per 30-gram serving (which is more than a comparable serving of chia or flax). Combine this with raw cacao powder, an egg, coconut oil and some peanut butter and you’ve yourself got quite a health bomb.

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Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup raw cacao powder

  • 1 cup + 2 T Manitoba Harvest Hemp Hearts

  • 2 eggs

  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

  • few drops of liquid stevia (optional - I didn’t use stevia but if you prefer sweeter, go for it )

  • 1 T coconut oil (melted)

  • 1/2 cup peanut butter

  • coarse salt

Directions:

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  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and spray mini cupcake tin with cooking spray

  2. In a bowl, mix the cacao, hemp heart , eggs, vanilla extract and stevia until well combined

  3. Spoon about a tablespoon of the mixture into each well in the cupcake tin

  4. Press down to form a little cup - shown here

  5. Bake for 10 minutes

  6. While the cups are baking, melt coconut oil and peanut butter in a double boiler

  7. Remove tray from oven after 10 minutes and allow to cool for 5-10 minutes

  8. Remove cups from pan and place them on a plate or flat surface

  9. Use a spoon to fill the cups up with the coconut oil / peanut butter mixture

  10. Freeze for 30 minutes

  11. Remove and sprinkle salt on top

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Dairy-Free Truffle Cream of Mushroom Soup

If someone asked me what the best meal of my life was, I would without any hesitation say Truffle Ravioli from a restaurant in Long, Branch, NJ. If I was to eat it now however, I’d have to probably take 2 personal days. So I attempted to recreate something as delicious without the GI upset. I give you….

Dairy-Free Truffle Cream of Mushroom Soup

Dairy-Free Truffle Cream of Mushroom Soup

Dairy-Free Truffle Cream of Mushroom Soup

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, diced

  • 1 small zucchini, cubed

  • 10 oz package sliced mushrooms

  • 2.5-3 T truffle oil (will be used in two parts)

  • 20 oz broth (I used chicken)

  • 4 oz canned coconut milk

  • 1/2 tsp salt (I used truffle salt for a truffle explosion

  • 1/4 tsp black pepper

  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder

Directions:

  1. In a large pot, heat 1.5-2 T truffle oil (depending on how strong you want the truffle flavor to be) over medium heat.

  2. Add in diced onions and cook for 2 minutes.

  3. Add in zucchini and stir to incorporate the oil and onion mixture. Cook for another 2 minutes

  4. Using only 2/3 of the 10 oz package of mushrooms, add to pot, stir and cook for another 2 minutes.

  5. Pour in chicken broth and let simmer for 5 minutes.

  6. Add coconut milk, salt, pepper and garlic powder and continue to cook for another 5-10 minutes until all vegetables are fork tender.

  7. While the soup is simmering, heat another 1-1.5 T truffle oil in a frying pan and sauté remaining mushrooms.

  8. Remove pot from heat. Use an immersion blender (or regular blender) to puree.

  9. If you used an immersion blender, stir in sautéed mushrooms and serve hot. If you used a regular blender, pour soup back into the pot, stir in sautéed mushrooms and serve hot.

Why I Stopped Keto

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My ketogenic journey started in June of 2018. I had given the ketogenic diet a try in the past but I didn’t really go all in. Earlier this year I began working with a muscle response specialist for help with some symptoms I was having (large swings in energy, occasional bloating, and a few other health issues). Through muscle response testing we discovered many foods were showing up as “problematic”. The foods that were left over were basically the foods “allowed” on a ketogenic diet: chicken, beef, turkey, fish, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, vegetables and berries. All grains, wheat, dairy, sugar, fruit, corn and basically everything else was a no-go.

With the release of “The Magic Pill” on Netflix, keto was suddenly the newest thing and I was getting a ton of questions about it. I thought to myself, “Hey these foods are the only thing my body seems to like so why not try it out for myself?” (Ironically it turns out I had another health condition that was leading to most of these health issues, and it really wasn’t the food causing the problem…..it’s like rainnnn on your wedding day…..)

So I made sure I did my research on how to implement this “diet” in the healthiest way possible. Obviously there are risks for nutrient deficiencies when you cut out certain food groups. I made sure I was prepared with electrolytes, digestive enzymes, keto products and so on. My focus was ALWAYS on food quality; I was not simply reducing my carbohydrate intake. I was still trying to fuel my body with the best food possible to heal my body while reducing inflammation and risk for disease. Hot dogs and cheese dips were not a staple. I think it’s also important to mention that going keto was not an attempt to lose weight. I thought it might be a side effect but I never expected to alter my body composition by going keto.

Now before I get into why I stopped keto I want to say this: I don’t want this post to come off as “anti-keto”. We all have different goals, lifestyles, genetics, accessibility, histories and preferences. I figured I would share my personal experience to provide some more information to you all. At the end of the day, you know your body better than anyone else. You know what feels good and what doesn’t; what works well and what doesn’t work at all. It’s up to you to figure out what feels best to you, keto or not :)

5 reasons Why I Stopped Keto

  1. Decreased Stamina and Athletic Performance: This was hands down the #1 reason why I was ready to ditch keto. My entire life I’ve been an athlete. From soccer, lacrosse, volleyball, softball and basketball to bodybuilding and just trying to beast out in the gym, athletics have always been a big part of my life. For a brief period of time I did notice an improvement in my aerobic capacity (cardio). Weight training however was a different story. I’ve obviously cut back on my weight training since my bodybuilding days but to say I felt weak was a massive understatement. I’d hardly finish foam rolling and band work and was already ready to call it quits. Step ups made me feel dizzy and squats were basically impossible beyond 6 reps. As someone that used to rack pull 315# (literally one time but still) and farmer’s carried 80# for 5 minutes straight, this feeling was horrible. For people that don’t workout or play sports, this isn’t really a big deal. But for someone who lives for that kind of stuff, it’s a massive bummer. I also recently signed up for an athletic event that requires I consume carbohydrates. Eating for athletic performance is something I personally prefer.

  2. The Mental Effects Started To Wear Off: The initial mental clarity I had on keto was awesome. I had lasting energy that would carry me through the day. My sleep was improved and I just felt awesome. After the first month or so the mental effects started to wear off on me. This doesn’t seem to be the case for everyone, but I just wasn’t as “sharp” as when I first started. Again, this could personally be due to other health issues I was dealing with as many people report continued mental clarity.

  3. I Never Felt Physical Hunger. You may be scratching your head wondering why this is a problem. Although the curbed appetite was great in some ways, after a while, not experiencing that hunger sensation in my stomach felt odd to me. I could “feel hunger” in other ways, like getting irritated, moody, or tired, but my stomach felt physically full. I would eat because I could hear my body telling me I needed nourishment but it’s super uncomfortable eating when your stomach feels full - it’s like you are force feeding yourself. Again, lack of hunger might not be a problem for you but after a while it was something I didn’t enjoy.

  4. I Missed Certain Foods: If you follow me on Instagram, you know I like to cook and get creative in the kitchen. I made tons of keto baked goods, breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks and I genuinely enjoyed the food I was eating on keto. The high fat content makes the food super tasty and satiating, until it wasn’t. I never had food cravings because my blood sugar was so stable and the food was so filling. It wasn’t like I was craving pizza and donuts; but I just started missing little things, like food that crunched, peanut butter and jelly and apples. Which bring me to my next bullet-point……

  5. It Was Becoming Moderately Triggering: With a past history of anorexia and bulimia, as much as I tried to not let it get to me, eventually the restriction became triggering. For a while it didn’t bother me because I believed those foods felt good in my body and I wanted to feel good. I was choosing those foods for health rather than weight loss. I was being as intuitive as possible with it; listening to my body (which is hard when if feels like your signals are blunted), choosing what I thought would feel good in my body, eating more carbs when I felt I needed them, etc. But for anyone that has had an eating disorder, food rules of any type can be detrimental. Eventually, that food police food voice, the one I had worked quite hard to silence, began creeping back in. It was at that point I was able to recognize, this is no longer working for me.

So with that being said, I’ve compiled a list of people I think keto might be good for, and who it may not be indicated for.

Who Do I Think Keto Is GOOD For?

  • Sedentary to lightly active people, non-athletes

  • Those with certain health conditions such as epilepsy, PCOS, or type 2 diabetes

  • People that feel like they have a crazy appetite / cravings or blood sugar / mood swings

  • Individuals who are willing to educate themselves about what happens in your body while on a ketogenic diet

  • Men seem to respond better than women as far as weight loss purposes go (generalization, but still)

Who Do I Think Keto Is NOT GOOD For?

  • Very active individuals / athletes especially distance runners, crossfitters, bodybuilders, powerlifters, etc.

  • Anyone with a history of eating disorders - (restriction of carbohydrates / food rules can be triggering)

  • People that don’t want to learn and just want to be told what to eat

  • Quick-fix chasers - this isn’t something you try for 5 days and cheat on on the weekends. That’s not how ketosis works

  • Italians (jk comic relief)

How Did Keto Affect My Weight?

As mentioned earlier, I did not set out on a keto journey in an effort to lose weight BUT because I know most people are interested in keto mostly for weight loss purposes, I’ll share my experience. Initially I probably lost 3-4 pounds of water but eventually my weight stabilized (I’ve probably weighed myself 5 times in the past 6 months so it’s hard to say with complete certainty). Initial weight loss on a keto diet is very typical because we store 3-4 grams of water per gram of glycogen (storage form of carbohydrate) stored. When we stop eating carbs, we burn through that stored glycogen which means we excrete the water stored with it. Weight loss can vary greatly from person to person. My body is at a weight it likes to be at and I didn’t really have much to lose. For others that feel they have a large # of pounds they want to lose, weight loss will likely be greater in some. The appetite suppressing effect tends to be helpful in an effort to shed to some pounds.

The longer I did keto, the more “flat” I felt. Bodybuilders will immediately understand that term. For everyone else, it basically means my muscles didn’t feel full. I felt….deflated, but not in a good way. When we eat carbohydrates, we break them down into glucose which we then store in our muscles as glycogen. Think of your muscles as little pipes and the glycogen fills those pipes up. That’s what makes the muscle look shapely. When we no longer consume carbs, we have less glycogen, aka less “filling” and the muscles then appear flat. (This is why bodybuilders will eat Reeses, Pixie Stix, and other carb-filled foods just prior to getting on stage. The carbohydrates fill them up and give them a vascular appearance). This “flatness” translated into poor performance for me.

Take Home Message

Everyone is different and there are always exceptions to every rule. I’m sure there are keto bodybuilders and distance runners. There are probably also plenty of people that have a history of an eating disorder but do well with keto. As I mentioned in the beginning of this post, this is simply my take and experience on keto. If you disagree, that is cool too. Personally, I think it was a great experience. I learned even more about my body and what works (or doesn’t) for me. Rather than taking my word, or anyone else’s word for it, figure out what feels good to YOU! In the meantime, I’ll be over here eating peanut butter and jelly chasing gainz :)

P.S.

And one last thing….just because I no longer follow a “strict keto diet” doesn’t mean I don’t eat similar things - I didn’t just start eating cake three times a day, although if I want to I will. Instead, I’m back to eating for athletic performance, personal enjoyment and overall health and balance.

Avocado Pesto

Who doesn't love a perfectly ripe avocado??? If you answered "I don't" then this probably isn't going to work out between us and maybe we should start seeing other people.......A soft avocado is one of life's greatest pleasures; as is pesto: another gift from God and favorite of mine.  So I decided to bring my true loves together and give pesto a MUFA / fiber-filled makeover. I give you, Avocado Pesto. Add some to a bowl of zoodles, spread some on top of grilled chicken or use as a salad dressing alternative. You could also just eat it with a spoon like I end up doing :) Enjoy!

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Avocado Pesto 

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup fresh basil

  • 2 large (or 4 small (I love the teeny tiny ones from Trader Joes)

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

  • 1/3 cup pine nuts

  • 1/3 cup lemon juice

  • 6 cloves of garlic

  • 1 tsp pink Himalayan salt (regular sea salt is fine)

  • pepper 

Directions: 

  1.  Combine all ingredients in food processor until a creamy consistency is reached. Taste and season to your liking with salt and pepper (You can also combine the ingredients in a bowl and blend with an immersion blender if you don't have a food processor).

Fountain of Youth Protein Shake

Inflammation is at the root of all chronic diseases. By reducing our consumption of processed, artificial and inflammatory foods we can reduce our risk for developing numerous chronic diseases such heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer’s. One way to reduce inflammation is by balancing out your omega-6 to omega-3 ratio. We can do this buy:

  1. Switching from conventional meat and animal products, to grass-fed, grass-finished ones

  2. Choosing healthier fats like avocado, avocado oil, extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil instead of vegetable or peanut oils.

  3. Consuming wild caught fatty fish like salmon 2-3 times per week

  4. Incorporating flax, chia and hemp seeds into your diet

Now a food doesn’t have to have omega-3’s to be considered “anti-inflammatory”. Plenty of foods such as blueberries, broccoli, spinach and bone broth fight inflammation. Green tea, herbs and spices like garlic, turmeric and ginger can help as well.

I’m always looking for ways to reduce inflammation so I can live until I’m 105. I’m also always trying to do so in a way that is easy and delicious. This protein shake packs a punch with bone broth protein concentrate and Sunfoods Golden Milk Powder. This powder is made with:

  • Turmeric and black pepper to balance inflammation in the body.

  • Maca, which helps to balance hormones and provides natural energy

  • Goji berry which provides antioxidants that eliminate free radicals

  • Boswell is which helps support immune function

  • Cardamom and ginger to help with digestion

  • Cinnamon which helps stabilize blood sugar and makes it delicious

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Fountain of Youth Protein Shake

Ingredients:

  • 1 scoop Ancient Nutrition Vanilla Bone Broth Concentrate

  • 1 tsp Sunfoods Golden Milk powder

  • 1/3 small zucchini

  • 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk beverage

  • 1/2 tsp chia seeds

  • 1 tsp Bulletproof Brain Octane Oil (optional)

  • 6-8 ice cubes

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high for 30-60 seconds

  2. Pour into glass and sprinkle a dash of cinnamon on top

Apple Pie Protein Shake

This fall-inspired protein shake packs a nutritional punch delivering 2 servings of veggies, brain boosting octane oil and collagen protein. You can enjoy this for breakfast, lunch, post-workout or dinner. Enjoy the taste of apple pie without the blood sugar crash or stomach ache!

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Apple Pie Protein Shake

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup riced cauliflower

  • 1/4 zucchini

  • 75 g gala apple

  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon

  • 1 tsp @bulletproof brain octane oil (optional)

  • 30 g vanilla collagen protein 

  • 10 small ice cubes (5-6 large)

  • 1 cup unsweetened almond milk

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender (I use a Vitamix) and blend on low speed for 15-20 seconds.

  2. Slowly increase speed to high.

  3. Add more liquid if needed.

  4. Pour into glass and top with a sprinkle of cinnamon.

Instant Pot Bone Broth

If you guys follow me on Instagram, you know I’m ALWAYS raving about bone broth. That’s because it’s one of the best things to consume to improve joint health, boost the immune system, treat leaky gut, overcome food intolerances / allergies and improve overall health. Bone broth is high in minerals such as magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, silicon and sulfur. It is also high in glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate which are associated with reducing inflammation and joint pain. Bone broth is high in collagen which can also help maintain healthy skin.

Okay so great! We know it’s good for you but how the heck do you make it?! I’ve receive a ton of questions via social media on how I make my bone broth so I figured I would blog about it AND make a video. So whether you are a visual learner or prefer to just read a recipe, here you go!

Instant Pot Bone Broth

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb beef, neck & knuckle bones (can also use chicken, pork or fish bones-USE HIGH QUALITY BONES, ideally GRASS-FED, GRASS-FINISHED. I got mine from Hudson & Charles)

  • 1 tub of chopped mirepoix from Trader Joe’s (or 1/3 C of each: celery, carrots, onions)

  • 4-5 garlic cloves, peeled

  • 2 T organic, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar (I like Braggs - check out more ways to use ACV)

  • 2 t pink himalayan salt

  • 1-2 t black pepper

  • 1 tsp crushed bay leaves (or 3-4 whole leaves)

  • 4-5 quarts filtered water (fill up to max fill line)

Directions:

  1. Plug in instant pot and click “soup” button. Using arrows, increase time to 230 minutes.

  2. Place bones into pot (it’s ok if the bones are frozen) and then add the mirepoix, apple cider vinegar, garlic, salt, pepper and bay leaves.

  3. Pour in filtered water until it reaches the max fill line. Stir.

  4. Secure the lid and let cook for 230 minutes.

  5. When the time is up, slowly and carefully shift the pressure value to the left or right to SLOWLY release some pressure. DO NOT look over the valve or put your hand over it as it could easily burn you. Be very careful and let the steam out slowly.

  6. When you no longer see or hear steam escaping, it is safe to open. Remove lid.

  7. Place a colander (with very fine holes) in large pot. Using a towel, dish rag or oven mits, pour the contents through the colander allowing all the liquid to pool in the pot.

  8. Discard the contents of the colander. (Thick beef bones can be saved to make a second batch of broth. Note: This second batch will be less flavorful and not contain nearly as many nutrients. It will likely not gel either as there will not be much collagen).

  9. Let cool for 30 minutes and divide into glass jars (You can also place a few ice cubes in the broth - it’s likely extremely concentrated so this little bit of ice shouldn’t do much to the flavor).

  10. Once the broth has cooled, transfer to fridge.

  11. Broth should keep 3-4 days in the fridge. To extend life, store in the freezer.

  12. Once cool, a layer of fat will form at the top of the jar. This fat is nutrient dense and great for cooking or baking. Skim the top and save for later use. (Fat can also be discarded).

  13. The broth will (hopefully) form a gel once it has cooled. This is a good thing! This means a lot of collagen was pulled from the bones! To consume, heat broth up on the stovetop and gel will turn into a liquid.

  14. I recommend having a cup a day! A cup a day keeps the doctor away!

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Coconut Chicken and Turmeric Cauliflower Rice

This recipe makes me so incredibly happy. Between the healthy fats (MCT) from the coconut oil, the high quality protein and anti-inflammatory properties of the turmeric, this dish packs a 1,2-punch! This recipe is keto friendly, paleo friendly, gluten and dairy free, Whole30 approved AND incredibly satisfying. It’s also a great way for anyone to make chicken interesting, not to mention it is incredibly easy and straight forward. Not sure about you guys, but whenever I see a recipe that calls for more than like 10 ingredients I’m just like…nope! Or when a blogger writes 3 chapters of their life story before getting to the ingredients! GIVE ME THE RECIPE ALREADY!!! To make it easier, I’ll break these two recipes up. Lets start with the turmeric cauliflower rice.

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Turmeric Cauliflower Rice

Ingredients:

  • 2 T organic virgin coconut oil

  • 1/2 t ground turmeric

  • 12 oz frozen riced cauliflower (Trader Joe’s has the hook up of course)

  • 1/2 t pink himalayan salt

  • 1/4 t black pepper

  • 2 T unsweetened coconut flakes

  • fresh parsley or cilantro (optional for garnishing)

Directions:

  1. Heat a large pan over medium heat. Once the pan is hot, add coconut oil and then turmeric.

  2. Stir turmeric into coconut oil for 30 seconds to warm.

  3. Add frozen cauliflower rice and cook for 2-3 minutes until soft.

  4. Add the salt, pepper, coconut and toss until well incorporated.

  5. Cook for an additional 2-3 minutes. Taste and adjust salt/pepper as desired.

  6. Top with chopped cilantro or parsley.

Coconut Chicken

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound organic, boneless, chicken breast, cut into chunks (or thighs-thighs are higher in fat, will taste more moist and is recommended for keto folks)

  • 1 T organic virgin coconut oil

  • 4 T unfiltered, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar (I use Braggs - check out more ways to use ACV )

  • 1/4 cup filtered water

  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed

  • 1/2 t pink himalayan salt

  • 1/2 t black pepper

  • 8 oz canned coconut milk

Directions:

  1. Add the coconut oil and diced chicken to a medium sauce pan over low-medium heat. Cook for 2 minutes

  2. Add the vinegar, water, and garlic and cooked for 3 minutes

  3. Add the salt and pepper and cook until almost all of the liquid boils down. This will probably be around 10 minutes.

  4. Stir in the coconut milk and simmer over low heat for 5-10 minutes until the liquid thickens.

  5. Serve over turmeric cauliflower rice.

Enjoy!